5 Ways Caprice Lounge Brings You Hygge this Winter

5 Ways Caprice Lounge Brings You Hygge this Winter

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh) is the Scandinavian word for a mood of coziness and comfortable conviviality with feelings of wellness and contentment. As the days get shorter and colder, we all need a cosy place to go and lift our spirits. I found my Hygge at Caprice Lounge at the Londa Hotel in Limassol this winter, and here’s why.

1/ Scandi Interiors

 

By mixing geometry and natural materials, so popular in Scandinavian interior design, the designers of Londa hotel have created a space that is clean and inviting at the same time. While in summer it gives you a sense of openness and lightness, in winter, the Caprice lounge brings Hygge to life, with plush blankets, cushions and a fireplace creating a super cosy atmosphere, that makes you want to stay all day.

 

2/ Sharing delicious food and drinks

 

A key part of Hygge is the act of sharing of food and delicious drinks between family and friends. I often come to Londa to share a cup of coffee with my partner. It’s also one of my favourite places to meet my girlfriends for drinks in the evening; cosying up by the fireplace with a glass of wine or one of their delicious cocktails.

3/ Enjoying the View

 

One of the major parts of Hygge is the feeling of appreciation and happiness for the simple things. Spending time in and appreciating nature always brings a sense of peace and comfort. The Caprice lounge is set on a terrace overlooking the Mediterranean sea, with unobstructed views onto the lapping waves and distant ships. It’s one of my favourite places to come to relax, enjoy the beautiful view and daydream.

4/ Sounds of live music

 

Good music is key to creating a relaxing atmosphere. Think lounge, classical pieces and jazz. On weekends and public holidays, the sounds of live piano stream through the lounge. What could be better during the winter months than snuggling up in a big cosy sofa with a hot cuppa, listening to live piano?

4/ A place to Linger

 

Spending quality time with friends and even yourself, is very Hygge. We are often so wrapped up in our schedules, always on the go, forgetting to linger and enjoy the moment. We finish our meals, get the bill and run off. Lingering is very important as it gives us time to relax and unwind, have deeper conversations and spend quality time with those who matter to us. What I really love about Caprice Lounge is that the staff is friendly, but not intruding. You can easily spend several hours there without anyone pressuring you to order another round or get the bill. Perfect for those long, winter evenings.

 

Whats your favourite place to linger and cosy up during the winter months?

Let me know in the comments!

Booking.com

Have you seen these?

5 Ways Caprice Lounge Brings You Hygge this Winter

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh) is the Scandinavian word for a mood of coziness and comfortable conviviality with feelings of wellness and contentment. As the days get shorter and colder, we all need a cosy place to go and lift our spirits. I found my Hygge at Caprice...

read more

Why You Should Visit Akamas National Park In Cyprus

Visit Akamas National Park in 360° Akamas is famed for its breath-taking beauty and precious ecology. A favourite with hikers and nature enthusiasts, this park offers several nature trails amidst the numerous species indigenous to the region. There are three official...

read more
Matapa Cooking Class from Local Women

Matapa Cooking Class from Local Women

A Humble but Important Dish

 

Matapa is a mozambican staple, served in every household, restaurant and market stall in the land. It’s virtually impossible to go out to eat, and not find Matapa on the menu. In fact, you can compare, and judge the cook, by the quality of their Matapa.

Matapa is made from freshly picked leaves of the cassava plant, coconut milk and peanut powder. Often it is cooked with fresh crab, which adds a nice layer of complexity with its delicate texture. It is not a sophisticated dish, but it has a lovely sweetness and heartiness to it.

The ingredients used to make Matapa are easy to find – they grow in every back yard. This is why Matapa is so prevalent here – it is an easy way to feed the family, no matter what your economic situation is. Cassava, as I have discovered, is a plant that will happily grow in the sand and doesn’t require any maintenance.

Last week, I was fortunate to spend a day with a family in a village of the Inhambane district and learn from the local women to plant cassava and cook Matapa.

Clearning the Land to Plant Cassava, dressed in Capulana

 

Here we are, clearing the land to plant cassava, which should produce plants within 3 months. Costanza, who welcomed us to her house, is to my left. As you can see, we are wearing matching skirts. In fact, this is a traditional textile, called Capulana. She kindly swaddled me up in this gorgeous Capulana so I could feel like a member of the community, and look the part during my visit to the village!

Farming cassava
Farming cassava
Farming cassava
Farming cassava

We made fresh coconut milk. From scratch!

I learnt the art of pounding.

poudning cassava for matapa
poudning cassava for matapa

Matapa Recipe

 

Want to try making Matapa in your own kitchen? It doesn’t require complicated ingredients and is almost impossible to mess up! Here’s a recipe for you, directly from the local women in Mozambique!

In case you can’t find fresh cassava leaves, use kale or spinach as a substitute.

Ingredients

1 large bunch cassava leaves (substitute with kale, or spinach,)

2 cloves garlic

1 3/4 cups unsalted peanuts

3/4 cup coconut milk

salt to taste

Method

Grind the cassava leaves with the cloves of garlic. Add to a large stockpot pot with a small quantity of water, just enough to submerge all of the ground greens. Bring this to a boil and allow it to continue bubbling on medium-high heat for about twenty minutes or until paste-like.

Meanwhile, blend the peanuts in a food processor to a fine powder. This should get you about 1 1/2 cups of ground peanuts. Mix the peanut powder with coconut milk. Pour this into the boiling greens and mix well.

Allow to simmer over low heat for 1-2 hours until you get a consistent, thick sauce.

Add sautéed prawns for extra flavour (optional).

Serve with generous portion of rice and a big smile!

 

Bom apetite!

Have you read these?

5 Ways Caprice Lounge Brings You Hygge this Winter

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh) is the Scandinavian word for a mood of coziness and comfortable conviviality with feelings of wellness and contentment. As the days get shorter and colder, we all need a cosy place to go and lift our spirits. I found my Hygge at Caprice...

Art Afternoon Tea London

Art Afternoon Tea   The Rosewood Hotel in London has just launched its Art Afternoon Tea experience, where the hotel's executive pastry chef Mark Perkins takes us on a creative journey with pastries inspired by renowned artists, including Yayoi Kusama, Alexander...

Art Afternoon Tea London

Art Afternoon Tea London

Art Afternoon Tea

 

The Rosewood Hotel in London has just launched its Art Afternoon Tea experience, where the hotel’s executive pastry chef Mark Perkins takes us on a creative journey with pastries inspired by renowned artists, including Yayoi Kusama, Alexander Calder, Mark Rothko, Damien Hirst, and Banksy.

What could be better than spending the afternoon enjoying the vibrant London art scene? An afternoon eating it.

 

Art Afternoon Tea

The Mirror Room

 

The Art Afternoon Tea is served within in the elegant Mirror Room, to the left of the Rosewood Hotel lobby.

High ceilings, quirky art works and plenty of rose gold set the tone for an afternoon of decadence.

Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel
Rosewood Hotel
Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel
 Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel

Classic Afternoon Tea with a Twist

 

The Art Afternoon Tea experience begins in traditional British fashion with a selection of sandwiches and scones.

Maldon smoked salmon with cream cheese and lemon.

Le Madru Ham, Comté cheese with a slither of wholegrain mustard.

The classic, but remarkably delicious, egg mayonnaise and chives.

Freshly-baked scones are accompanied by smooth clotted cream, home-made strawberry jam and zesty lemon curd.

Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel
Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel

The selection of teas is also impeccable. With a range of white, yellow, green, black, oolong and even pu-erh infusions, tea connoisseurs will not be left wanting.

The staff is very attentive and quick to top you up, or change your tea set for a new flavour.

Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel
Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel

Edible Works of Art

 

The pinnacle is of course the edible masterpieces designed in homage of iconic works created by contemporary artists.

Banksy’s Girl With a Balloon, appears on a white chocolate cube filled with a vanilla cream pastry, oozing salted caramel.

Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel
Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel

Nodding to the recent exhibition by the Japanese sculptor Yayoi Kusama, Chef Perkins creates a baravois inspired by Kusama’s pumkins. But don’t be fooled. As modern as it looks, the pastry tastes like a fruit basket – a timeless blend of strawberry, vanilla cream and shortbread cookie. A lovely touch of the familiar in the unexpected.

Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel

Motifs of Damian Hirst’s works find themselves in a berry macaron with yuzu curd and a redcurrant heart. Crunchy on the outside and soft and chewy on the inside.

Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel
Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel

Paints down, the best macaron I’ve had in London.

Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel

The Art Afternoon Tea is priced at £55 per person (£65 per person with a glass of “R” de Ruinart Champagne or £67 per person with a glass of “R” de Ruinart Rosé Champagne). It is a fantastic option for a special occasion – art lovers and foodies will be blown away.

But don’t forget to wear a loose belt and get that pinky up! This is fancy!

Art Afternoon Tea Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel
Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel
Mirror Room Rosewood Hotel

Classic Cars and Cool Cocktails in Vienna

Classic Cars and Cool Cocktails in Vienna

Did you know, that some of the biggest names in Formula One made their debut by racing cars built by a man from a quiet Viennese suburb? Neither did I, until this weekend.

Alex and I took the 7:30 a.m. train to Vienna from Munich Central station. There’s something dreamy about morning train journeys – the crunch of pastry bags, the steady rocking of the train car, the sun’s rays fanning out through tree tops, still wrapped in morning mist. Outside the scenery alternates between postcard valleys and shimmering, fluffy corn fields. Pastures, perfectly trimmed, are slowly chewed on by sleepy cows. Occasionally, there’s a lake, blue and shimmering in the morning sun.

Upon arrival in Vienna, we checked into the Steinenberg Herrehof hotel. Located smack bang in the centre, it’s a great base for walking around the historic quarter and the main shopping area. The narrow cobbled streets surrounding the hotel are lined with shop windows displaying artisanal jewellery, sweets and weird and wonderful tricklets.

Just off Michaelerplatz, you find yourself in the midst of luxury boutiques, and schools of middle-eastern tourists navigating the stony landscape, laden with shopping bags and children in toe.  We turned off, into the side streets, to find shelter from the heat on a shaded terrace of a small trattoria. A cold white wine spritz is just what you need in this weather.

Train journey to vienna
vienna rooftops
Michaelertrakt vienna

Classic Cars and Family Heirlooms

After refreshing ourselves, we took a drive out into Donaustadt to meet an old friend of Alex’s father. Karl Holzinger, an antique car collector now in his 80s, greets us openly, with a firm handshake and eager eyes. He is dressed in a blue-striped shirt and suit pants. He carries himself upright, with a headful of long silver hair and plenty of charm. I imagine the kind of havoc him and Eberhard wreaked on racetracks back in the day. Without further ado, he leads us into his garage.

One of the cars is an original from Winkler Racing – Eberhard’s team.  He is a picture of nostalgia. While his father is reminiscing, Alex is nose-diving into the engine, all light up, like a kid who just met his favourite superhero. I notice how meticulously the cars are looked-after – every bit of leather is softened, every piece of steel is polished, and not a speck of dust on any hood.

Winkler Racing Vintage Car
Winkler Racing Classic Car
Winkler Racing Classic Car

After the private collection tour, we headed out to the local VW garage for a little party. Think big, open space with tall ceilings, island bars clothed in white and a display of vintage race cars from 1970’s and 1980’s.

The star of the show was a twin engine Volkswagen golf.  For rookies like me, this is a car with one engine in the front and one in the back. Why a car needs two engines is beyond me. I guess I’ll just stick to soaking up the atmosphere and the free-flowing champagne!

The garage was celebrating its 50 years of building racecars. Back in the 1960’s it’s original owner, Kurt Bergmann, pioneered “people’s racing”, now known across Europe as Formula Vee.

He experimented with the Volkswagen beetle, turning it into an open-wheeler, and developed technologies that transformed motorsports. These DIY cars, built in Austrian suburbia, had a higher corner speed than Formula 1, and an average speed of 163 km/h on the racetrack.

They say Kurt was so passionate about his work that he had tools everywhere – in his living room, in his bedroom, in his bathroom. Inwardly, I feel for his wife. Today Kurt is a sweet man of 87, happily pushing start buttons on a suspended engine for the delight of the party guests and the village photographers.

They say Kurt was so passionate about his work that he had tools everywhere – in his living room, in his bedroom, in his bathroom.

Plachutta Tafelspitz viena

Plachutta – a local’s favourite

 

Once back in central Vienna, we strolled through the cooling streets to  Plachutta, a gastronomical institution recommended by Karl. I had a Hugo to start – a refreshing cocktail of prosecco, elderflower, and mint, and decided that there’s nothing better on a summer evening in the city.

We ordered a Viennese schnitzel, and tafelspitz – a traditional Viennese dish of boiled beef. It is served in its broth, with creamed spinach and rosti potatoes on the side. The brass pots are placed onto an electric hot plate, which means you can spend several hours eating the dish without it going cold.  Admittedly, it is not the lightest of meals. However, it is as Viennese as it gets and it’s definitely worth working up an appetite for. Try the Kruspelspitz, the piece between 7th and 8th rib; so tender, it melts in your mouth.

Vienna Waits for You

The next morning we took the train back to Munich. I really enjoyed our short getaway to Vienna. The city feels like it doesn’t have anything to prove. Life runs at a slower pace. People take the time to enjoy long meals and each other’s company.  Creativity flows freely.  Whether it’s from pen to paper, or in the folds of pastry makers, or the oil-strained fingers of supercar builders. It comes as no surprise that Vienna produced so many talents. The Viennese seemed to have cracked the code –  do what you love and everything else will fall into place.
girl traveller vienna

Pin It on Pinterest